Random acts of Wyzeness 🎲

I understood what you meant, and I agree with what you’re saying. I’m just doing some stream-of-consciousness replies and sharing my opinions that no one requested. :wink:

Way off topic, I might add…though the :frog: did give this thread an appropriate title….

Anyway, I think we have similar motives and goals and agree that we can’t prescribe a solution without a diagnosis, and we can’t even get to that point if we don’t know what the actual problem is, and asking the right questions is a necessary part of that process.

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To me, this is always welcome :+1: It is much preferable to an alternative of a dead, boring forum not worth coming to.

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There you go again, saying more things I agree with. :roll_eyes:

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I defy Discourse platform to accurately reflect my behavior statistically. I mean I deny that it can do it. Exhibit One: Empathy is presented as the quality valued most by the system and how is it determined? Heartcoin. Idiotic since giving a heart is about as non-specific with respect to intent as it can be. Boy howdy. That’s dumb. :wink:

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People think I just spew onto the board everything that occurs to me (how do I know what people think I don’t) but heres an example of my highly-evolved restraint this would have been post #9 but for the text that now occupies it.

I hit a real pain point. It took some will to troubleshoot and describe the problem to the extent I did. That’s not a good sign. It means I’m fed up.

And I have six new v3s coming soon that I hesitate to deploy for the anomalies I may encounter.

I don’t have the access nor the experience and expertise to fairly judge if Wyze is competent. But at the moment I’m leaning toward they’re not. Hopefully this will change.

Is this constructive to know and to know out of sequence? Maybe maybe not but there it is.

Take it FWIW, Wyze friends. You pissed off the pretty good humor man. :slight_smile:

I get that, and if you’re wondering why I gave that particular post a :heart:, then in that case it was out of sheer orneriness. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

If the :athletic_shoe: fits…. :man_shrugging: (I’m :point_left: at myself here.)

I think it’s constructive for at least a couple of reasons:

  1. Often releasing frustration can be at least somewhat cathartic, in contrast to internalizing it and allowing toxic pressure to build.
  2. Describing a problem in a way that others can recognize and identify with has the potential to attract more comments about the same shared experience, and that can be an indicator of the frequency and severity of the problem. (We can’t solve a problem if we don’t know that the problem exists.)

So I think there’s utility to verbalizing those concerns. Whether or not they get the right :eyes: on them is another issue entirely, though, and that’s where I think the :game_die: in your topic title is particularly apt, because that part of the experience is kind of a crapshoot.

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I hope it can serve that purpose. :crossed_fingers:

:heart:

It’s the coin of the realm. At base I use it to convey good will and encouragement. Often agreement or appreciation. I don’t use it ironically. Beyond that I am not consistent in how I do or don’t use it. It’s kind of a ‘whatever.’ I don’t dislike getting them. I don’t think it hurts to give them. I just wish its meaning was clear and understood by all.

Last point to belabor:

But in the end I must. I do my best. :slight_smile:

That’s my hope when I post about a problem I’m experiencing or question I have, as well.

This is how I use them, as well. I also click them on if a particular post actually makes me laugh or resonates with me in a particular way. I genuinely appreciated your previous post, which is part of my reasoning for giving the :heart:; the ornery part just felt like the :heart: was necessary because you were making a point specifically about them, so it felt like the thing to do. I’m easily amused.

I think the vagueness, for me, is part of the charm—and that’s kind of what the :heart: is, in a way: a charm. I can understand how that could also be perceived as somewhat problematic because it’s maybe not the most accurate reflection of whatever metric someone is seeking, but it strikes me as potentially less toxic and less likely to lead to direct conflict than the :arrow_up:/:arrow_down: of something like Reddit or the :+1:/:-1: of YouTube. This is my first exposure to the Discourse platform, and the more I use it, the more I like it (and I just learned something about it by playing around with it today, in fact).

I don’t have the insight into Wyze operations, like some here do. My perspective is merely from that of an outside user, someone who enjoys solving problems and trying to help others, and someone who has provided support professionally in the past (which is why it pains me to see how broken Wyze Support appears to be).

I reckon that’s about all any of us can do. :upside_down_face:

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I can roll with that. :slight_smile:

I dig, and that leads me to another off-topic thought: While reading and responding to this topic, I’ve wondered about at least two potential Word of the Day candidates:

That made me think of (note the spelling difference)…

image

…and…

image

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Two good’uns, post 'em up if you want, it’s a totally open thread.

I once came across but had forgotten about pixilated, hard to believe, I know. :grin:

Yeah, I get it. I’ve considered it. One (word of the) day at a time, eh?

For some reason, I tend to associate that one with William Powell, like I’m thinking he may have made reference to that in at least one of the “Thin Man” movies, where his character was frequently imbibing. :cocktail:

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In high school I had to take the ‘Evelyn Wood Speed Reading Course’.

As someone with ADD, this actually helped studying. The main idea is to read the first sentence in the paragraph, glance through the remainder of the paragraph, then move to the next paragraph, if I remember correctly. It involves skimming, reading chunks of words rather than individual words, and not internally vocalizing the words.

A required course at Ranken was ‘How to win friends and influence people’

This was for students planning to be service writers.

The last 5 years of my career the owner moved me from the shop to the front office. My body really appreciated that. My mother told me I could sell her her own wedding ring. People trusted me and the single women were treated like my sister would be. I would guess 70% of the people dropping their car off were women, even if there was a man in the family.

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That’s a great book. We recommend our employees read it (among others) and will count it toward certain qualifications to get an extra raise if they want to do things to get a raise sooner than normal by doing things to demonstrate they’re improving themselves more than normal.

As for speed reading, I do something similar with some (but not all) forum posts. :slight_smile: I’m sure lots of people do that with lots of my long posts :joy:

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