Wow, A Hawk (or Falcon?) at the Birdbath this Morning!

I’m still :astonished: at this.

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Awesome. :heart_eyes: Looks like a juvenile (less than 2 years old) red-tailed hawk.

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Are you sure? I didnt think we had red talked hawks here in N.C. At least I’ve never seen any where I live.

They are very common in NC. Actually all across the US. They are also commonly misidentified due to juveniles not having red (rusty) tails until around 2+ years and they are polymorphic raptors.

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Looking for :cat2: snacks. :grin: :grin: :grin: You’ll need a bigger bath for that one.

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My brother said it is one as well. What makes them polymorphic?

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Thanks guys. I changed my video Title.

TL;DR: There are multiple color and pattern varieties of red-tailed hawks.

A predictable color change trait of a species over x time in lifespan is a “phase”. E.g., a juvenile red-tailed hawk’s tail color is temporary/ephemeral and predictably changes to a rusty color in adulthood. An unpredictable color change of a species’ offspring is a “morph” in that the color of an adult offspring may differ from the parents and it does not change over the offspring’s lifespan. E.g., there are numerous color and pattern varieties of red-tailed hawks’ plumage. There are many hypotheses for polymorphism in raptors, but no one really knows the answer to why. My best guess is an epigenome mark in a parent is “switched” on based on exposure to some unknown environmental factor.

https://science.uct.ac.za/fitzpatrick/research-understanding-biodiversity-evolutionary-and-behavioural-ecology/understanding-colour-polymorphism-birds

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Interesting. Thanks.

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We have our own Cliff Clavin in our midst!

:nerd_face:

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Who is that?

A quite knowledgeable mailman who gladly shared bits of information as if reciting from an encyclopedia

From the TV show Cheers.

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Just a lineage of scientists. :grin: Mom was a zoology and botany professor.

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Here is a video of possibly a hawk hunting a rabbit in my backyard (I will let the Wyze bird experts chime in). The rabbit is near the white chair, hops away with the bird flying after it.

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Ahh ok haha.

Too dark and low framerate to tell. Heck, it could even be an owl.

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Yes, very dark and far away. My Backyard v3 is my testing new firmware camera. If new firmware breaks functionality, I don’t really care. Generally only captures animals cutting through my yard. I was surprised to see what appeared to be a bird hunting the rabbit.

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It’s extremely rare for a hawk to hunt at night, but not impossible in well-lighted neighborhoods. Owls on the other hand… The sights that go unseen as we sleep comfortably in our warm beds. :grin:

Wow, maybe it was an owl.

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When I lived in Florida, I saw a hawk eating something on the ground near a pine tree. It was dusk, but not really dark.

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