120v/240v smart thermostat?

When it comes to the smart thermostat market it’s flooded with many alternatives including Wyze’s own option. The problem is is that there’s more than just one type of thermostat, one that’s highly ignored, that is the 120/240 volt thermostat and the very rare smart version, they’re usually used for baseboard or in floor heating. While not the most popular type of heating it is one that needs some attention and is usually purchased in groups, as each room usually gets its own thermostat. Right now I think the biggest name in the market is Mysa or Hoot (Mysa in my case) but it is ripe for profit from a bigger smart home manufacturer like Wyze, I alone have six in my house. I would have rather gotten from a more prevalent smart home system but the options are so thin that you have to take what you get (Mysa is not bad but why use a new system when I’m already in Wyze/Google’s). One of the main reasons why a smart 120v/240v thermostat is good is that the systems use quite a bit of energy and smart radiators that know when your home or not prevent that high energy usage. Please save us 120/240v users from a stagnant market!

I don’t understand. Why couldn’t a 240 V heating system use exactly the same low voltage thermostats as everybody else? It’s not as if you need 240V running through the little control box on the wall. That’s what relays are for.

I mean common 24 VAC thermostat wiring. There is no reasonable argument why you need to run 240 (or 120) Volts through a thermostat. Does your system really require this?

Yes? It’s part of the houses circuit they are electric base board heaters so it goes from breaker, to thermostat and close by room heater. The usual low volt thermostats are usually connected to a HVAC or furnaces. I’m my case my set of townhouses are primarily electric (not sure why) and would require a huge effort and cost from residence and strata to change to some other system. Lucky where I am electric is cheap, in abundance and reliable.

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I have no idea what happened to my comment up there thought I was posting another reply to ya but somehow ended up editing my first reply,

Okay thanks. I am probably showing my ignorance on electric heating…

That’s ok, not too common in some areas especially on public streets where the gas line is right there and/or in my case where external HVAC is against strata. I know some apartments are also baseboard, it’s not so bad specialty if it’s smart which was why I was surprised to the lack of options. Another plus is electrical heating is heavy on oil/gas plants, smart thermostats for Electrical heating can be influenced by power companies (if accepted) and really help on their load. I mean it’d suck to have a 18°c (64°f) house but you could opt to heat just your bedroom and lower all others not the overall house.

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Thanks for your grace. I didn’t realize how wrong I was. This is especially important to learn as localities move to ban fossil fuel heating…

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They’re more common over in the UK, where all the thermostats have line voltage running through them, even the ones that operate non-electric heat.

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I’ve managed to use a Wyze thermostat with a dual pole electric garage heater. It required some electrical know how and willingness to wire things up yourself, but it’s possible.

That’s the point you have to have electrical know how. Would you recommend a complete novice do that themselves though? When it came to changing the basic thermostats that I have with Mysa it was just turn off power unscrew, rewire, screw in, set up and done I imagine it would be the same if wyze was to make their own thermostat. No relays, extra space or electrical know how really needed that’s why I say it’s a missed chance for wyze.

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The Wyze thermostat, like most runs on 24 volts. If you would like to control a 120/240 appliance you could use a relay. Think of a relay as a remote controlled switch, when the thermostat sends 24v to the relay the “switch” turns “on” and lets the high voltage power through. You would just need to find a relay with a 24v coil and contacts rated for the load of your equipment. This is actually how most central air systems work. There is a relay (contactor) inside the unit that receives 24v from the thermostat, energizing the coil and closing a set of contacts to power the unit on. This would be fairly easy to do with an electric heater as well.

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I would buy two of these. The newer part of my old house is heated with electric.

Wyze thermostat for electric baseboard heating

Hi, a version for electric baseboard heating will be great for the Wyze Thermostat.